Syllabus
English Composition I

English Composition I

ENGL-1301

Credit Fall 2019
08/26/2019 - 12/15/2019

Course Information

Section 267
Lecture
MW 11:05 - 12:40
CHS1 268
Colin Shanafelt

Section 295
Lecture
MW 13:25 - 14:50

Colin Shanafelt

Office Hours

  • M W
    10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
    SAC 1224
    Office: SAC 1224 (MW 10:00am - 11:00am)
    
Phone: 512-223-9207
    
Mailbox: SAC 1141 (Mail & Duplication Center)

Course Subjects

Austin Community College

English 1301 - Composition I

Dual Credit - Crockett High School

Fall 2019 - 16 Week Session: August 26 - December 15
 
 
Colin Shanafelt

Professor of English, Adj.

Email: cshanafe@austincc.edu

Website: www.austincc.edu/cshanafe

Office: SAC 1224 (MW 10:00am - 11:00am)

Phone: 512-223-9207

Mailbox: SAC 1141 (Mail & Duplication Center)

*Drop by during office hours or email to schedule a conference 
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION 
English Composition I 
A study of the principles of composition with emphasis on language, the mechanics of writing, the types of discourse, and research and documentation.
 
REQUIRED TEXTS / MATERIALS

Please acquire the following required texts/materials prior to class: 
  1. Everything’s An Argument: W/ Readings   ISBN - 9781319056261

  2. MLA Handbook  8th (2016 update) ISBN - 9781603292627 (Recommended)

  3. Composition I File Folder (ACC Bookstores)
** Regarding MLA 2016 documentation, students are encouraged to reference the MLA Handbook (8th edition with 2016 update) and the Owl at Purdue website at the following link: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_general_format.html
 
USE OF ACC EMAIL
All College e-mail communication to students will be sent solely to the student’s ACCmail account, with the expectation that such communications will be read in a timely fashion. ACC will send important information and will notify you of any college related emergencies using this account. Students should only expect to receive email communication from their instructor using this account. Likewise, students should use their ACCmail account when communicating with instructors and staff. Instructions for activating an ACCmail account can be found at http://www.austincc.edu/accmail/index.php.
 
INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY

Course material will be delivered via in-class lectures, assigned reading, small group activities, use of electronic media, writing assignments, and in-class writing workshops.
 
ESSAYS AND ASSIGNMENTS
Students will submit five essays over the course of the semester, including an essay known as the Departmental Exam, for a total minimum of 4000 words. Professor Shanafelt will provide specific written guidelines for each assignment. The Departmental Exam is an exit-level test graded Pass/Fail, which will be written in an ACC Testing Center. DIL, SAS, and Dual Credit students may be allowed other program-approved options. 
 
Essay & Assignment Details:
  • Students will learn to develop a writing project through multiple drafts.
  • Essay assignments will develop arguments and ideas using at least two rhetorical purposes (expressive, referential, persuasive, and/or literary) and several rhetorical strategies (narration, description, cause/effect, comparison/contrast, definition, illustration, process analysis, evaluation).
  • The research process will be a significant focus of the class, with assignments sequenced to build facility with integration of outside source material using MLA format. Early assignments will involve work with one or two sources, building to a more substantial research project.
  • At least one essay will be a textual analysis in which students demonstrate the ability to identify an essay’s purpose, audience, thesis, and rhetorical strategies and evaluate the essay’s effectiveness.
  • Students will be given one objective Final Exam covering the all course material.
  • Professor Shanafelt will assign a letter grade to each essay and provide written feedback comments. 
  • Students must provide Professor Shanafelt with a Composition I File Folder (ACC Bookstores).
  • Students must return final papers with comment sheets to Professor Shanafelt no later than the next class meeting after the graded essays were returned. He will keep them on file for one semester in your Composition I File Folder.
  • Paper formatting guidelines can be found at https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_general_format.html
*Proper paper format is reflected in the score you receive, so carefully follow the guidelines.
  • Extra Credit: Students will have the opportunity to receive three additional (extra credit) grades of 100. See the Extra Credit assignment on page 7 for full details.
  • Course Grades: A = 90-100, B = 80-89, C = 70-79, D = 60-69, F = Below 60
  • Marked Grades: (A+ = 98, A = 95, A- = 92, 90 = 90, etc.)
 
Writing Assignments:
1. Persuasion/Argument (2 sources)

2. Comparison & Contrast (3 sources)

3. Textual Analysis (4 sources)
4. Departmental Exam (ACC Testing Center)

5. Research Paper (5 sources)
 

Research Paper:

Students will write one research paper of at least 1000 words using MLA 2016 style (8th ed), citing a minimum of FIVE sources including at least three peer-reviewed journal articles and two other types of source.  ** Websites and “.com” sources are forbidden. ** Tutorials & Due Dates:
Students will complete the Academic Honesty/Plagiarism tutorial and ALL ENGL 1301 English Composition I Research Paper tutorials located at http://library.austincc.edu/help/Tutorials.php. Students will be award credit for due dates on a pass/fail basis. Print certificates of completion and submit in class on the due date.
 
Reading:

Students will be assigned reading selections, which are due at the beginning of class on the day they are assigned. Unless noted, all reading selections can be found in the required textbook for this course. Professor Shanafelt may or may not give pop quizzes over the reading.
 


Graded Papers & Composition I File Folders:

Graded essays should be returned to Professor Shanafelt with grade sheets the next class day after the essays were passed back to students. This is irrespective of whether any revisions or corrections have been made.


 
The Departmental Exam:

All eligible students must take the Departmental Exam. Eligible students must have had all essays accepted and/or a D average. Students will write an interpretive essay of at least 600 words analyzing the provided selection. Professor Shanafelt will provide more detailed instructions about the exam, which will be evaluated “PASS” “FAIL & RETEST” OR “FAIL” only. Students who do not pass on the first try may retest once. Students who do not pass on the second attempt will receive an F for the course. Essays must demonstrate the following:
Coherence, analytical thinking, and an understanding of the selection’s thesis, purpose(s), and method(s) of development; 
Adherence to stylistic, grammatical, and mechanical conventions of standard written English.
Final Exam:

Students will take a Final Exam near the end of the semester. The test will count as an essay grade (80% category). The Final Exam will be an objective test comprised of multiple choice, matching, and true/false questions. The test will cover all material presented in class including grammar, mechanics, rhetorical situations, patterns of organization, MLA documentation, etc. Students must bring a 100-question Scantron form to class on the day of the test (green half sheet). Scantron forms are available at the ACC bookstores. The test is timed for the duration of the class period. 

*Professor Shanafelt may also assign readings, quizzes, in-class writing activities, Learning Lab work, presentations, group projects, and other activities that will also affect final grades.
 
PAPER FORMAT REQUIREMENTS

Students are required to format their essays in accordance with the guidelines set out in the MLA Style Manual 8th edition.  Format guidelines can found at the following link: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_general_format.html
 
GRADING
  • Professor Shanafelt will assign letter grades to all required essays. Students may be given the opportunity to draft and revise required essay assignments one time (see description below). Students are required to pass the Departmental Exam (see description in this syllabus) in the SAC Testing Center in order to pass the course with a minimum grade of “C.”
  • Assignment Weights:
 Essay Revisions:
  • Students will be given the opportunity to revise essays one time to receive a small score increase not to exceed 5 points. 
  • Revised essays must be turned in to Professor Shanafelt no later than the following class day after the graded essays were returned in class. 
  • If a student is absent on the day graded essays are returned, the due date for revisions is the next class day after the student returns. It is the student’s responsibility to request his/her graded essay.
  • Revised papers must be turned in with the original copy, grade sheet, and the newly revised essay. All revisions must be highlighted.
  • Students may not revise the Departmental Exam or the Research Paper.
  • 
Late Work:
Essays - There will be a letter grade deduction for every calendar day an essay is late. If a student will be absent on the day an essay is due, he/she should place the completed essay in Professor Shanafelt's SAC campus mailbox where it will be stamped with the date and time. Make sure to get it there before the beginning of class on the day it is due. 
Assignments - Students who are absent on the day of a quiz or an in-class activity will receive a zero for that quiz or activity. There is no way to make up missed quizzes or due dates. Students who are late to class and miss the quiz will receive a zero for that quiz; there is no way to make it up.
ATTENDANCE

Attendance is mandatory. Professor Shanafelt does check attendance. Students can miss four classes without penalty. Upon a student's fifth absence, Professor Shanafelt will withdraw him/her from the course or assign an F as his/her overall course grade. From attending a concert to attending a funeral, all absences are valid. Please do not bring a doctor’s note or try to explain an absence. Every absence counts. In order to be marked present, students must stay until the end of the class. For example, if a student comes to class and then leaves before class is dismissed, that absence counts as one of the four allowed. Students may wish tell Professor Shanafelt of an absence beforehand, but all absences always count. 
 
WITHDRAWAL POLICY
The Texas State Legislature passed a bill stating that students who first enroll in public colleges and universities beginning in fall 2007 and thereafter may not withdraw from more than six classes during their undergraduate college career. See ACC Student Handbook for further information.
 
It is the responsibility of each student to ensure that his or her name is removed from the roll should he or she decides to withdraw from the class. Professor Shanafelt does, however, reserve the right to drop a student should he feel it is necessary. If a student decides to withdraw, he or she should also verify that the withdrawal is submitted before the Final Withdrawal Date. The student is also strongly encouraged to retain their copy of the withdrawal form for their records. The last day to withdraw without a grade of W: September 11 (Wednesday). The last day to withdraw from the Fall 16-week semester with a grade of W: November 21 (Thursday). 
 
AWARDING OF “INCOMPLETE” AS A FINAL GRADE
Professor Shanafelt may award a grade of “I” (Incomplete) if a student was unable to complete all of the objectives for the passing grade in a course. An incomplete grade cannot be carried beyond the established date in the following semester. The completion date is determined by Professor Shanafelt but may not be later than the final deadline for withdrawal in the subsequent semester. Professor Shanafelt almost never assigns incomplete ('I') grades.
 
ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT AND PLAGIARISM
Acts prohibited by the College for which discipline may be administered include scholastic dishonesty (e.g., cheating on an exam or quiz, plagiarizing, and unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing outside work). Academic work submitted by students shall be the result of their thought, research, or self-expression. Academic work is defined as (but not limited to) tests and quizzes, whether taken electronically or on paper; projects, either individual or group; classroom presentations; and homework. Plagiarism can be defined as using the words and ideas of another writer without acknowledging the debt. Plagiarism takes many forms, including the omission of parenthetical citations, the failure to place quotation marks around direct or modified content taken from another source, and another person writing the essay for the student. It is of utmost importance for students to understand that in academic and professional life, plagiarism of any kind is absolutely unacceptable. Therefore, acts of plagiarism, major or minor, may have serious repercussions, which could include a failing grade, expulsion from the class, and/or disciplinary action on the part of the College. Specific policies can be found in individual faculty syllabi; College policies can be found in the ACC Student Handbook.
 
STUDENT FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
Each student is strongly encouraged to participate in class. In any classroom situation that includes discussion and critical thinking, there are bound to be many differing viewpoints. These differences enhance the learning experience and create an atmosphere where students and instructors alike will be encouraged to think and learn. On sensitive and volatile topics, students may sometimes disagree not only with each other but also with the instructor. It is expected that faculty and students will respect the views of others both when expressed in classroom discussions or class-related writing.
 
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Students at the college have the rights accorded by the U.S. Constitution to freedom of speech, peaceful assembly, petition, and association. These rights carry with them the responsibility to accord the same rights to others in the college community and not to interfere with or disrupt the educational process. Opportunity for students to examine and question pertinent data and assumptions of a given discipline, guided by the evidence of scholarly research, is appropriate in a learning environment. This concept is accompanied by an equally demanding concept of responsibility on the part of the student. As willing partners in learning, students must comply with college rules and procedures.
 
Enrollment in the college indicates acceptance of the rules set forth in this policy, which is administered through the office of the campus dean of student services. Due process, through an investigation and appeal process, is assured to any student involved in disciplinary action.
 
General Provisions: The purpose of this policy is to identify the rights and responsibilities of ACC students, to specify acts prohibited and standards of conduct required, and to set a range of appropriate penalties when rules are violated.
  • Due Process: College disciplinary procedures respect the due process rights of students.
  • Emergency Action: Provisions are included to protect the college and members of the college community in emergencies and other instances requiring immediate action. Even in such instances, the college will take reasonable steps to provide for due process.
  • Administration of Discipline: The campus dean of student services or the appropriate facility administrator shall have primary responsibility for the administration of student discipline. The campus dean of student services works cooperatively with faculty members in the disposition of scholastic violations.
STUDENT ACCESSIBILITY SERVICES (SAS)
Each ACC campus offers support services for students with documented physical or psychological disabilities. Students with disabilities must request reasonable accommodations through the SAS office on the campus where they expect to take the majority of their classes. Students are encouraged to do this three weeks before the start of the semester.  
 
SAFETY STATEMENT 
Austin Community College is committed to providing a safe and healthy environment for study and work. You are expected to learn and comply with ACC environmental, health and safety procedures and agree to follow ACC safety policies. Additional information on these can be found at http://www.austincc.edu/ehs. 
 
Because some health and safety circumstances are beyond our control, students should become familiar with the Emergency Procedures poster and Campus Safety Plan map in each classroom. Additional information about emergency procedures and how to sign up for ACC Emergency Alerts to be notified in the event of a serious emergency can be found at http://www.austincc.edu/emergency/.
 
Please note, students are expected to conduct themselves professionally with respect and courtesy to all. Anyone who thoughtlessly or intentionally jeopardizes the health or safety of another individual will be immediately dismissed from the day’s activity, may be withdrawn from the class, and/or barred from attending future activities.
 
Concealed Handgun Policy
The Austin Community College District concealed handgun policy ensures compliance with Section 411.2031 of the Texas Government Code (also known as the Campus Carry Law), while maintaining ACC’s commitment to provide a safe environment for its students, faculty, staff, and visitors.
Beginning August 1, 2017, individuals who are licensed to carry (LTC) may do so on campus premises except in locations and at activities prohibited by state or federal law, or the college’s concealed handgun policy. 
It is the responsibility of license holders to conceal their handguns at all times. Persons who see a handgun on campus are asked to contact the ACC Police Department by dialing 222 from a campus phone or 512-223-7999.
*** Refer to the concealed handgun policy online at austincc.edu/campuscarry.
 
TESTING CENTER POLICY
Under certain circumstances, an instructor may have students take an examination in a testing center. Students using the Academic Testing Center must govern themselves according to the Student Guide. Use of ACC Testing Centers and should read the entire guide before going to take the exam. 
 
To request an exam, one must have:
  1. ACC Photo ID
  2. Course Abbreviation (e.g., ENGL)
  3. Course Number (e.g.,1301)
  4. Course Synonym (e.g., 10123)
  5. Course Section (e.g., 005)
  6. Instructor's Name
Do NOT bring cell phones to the Testing Center. Having your cell phone in the testing room, regardless of whether it is on or off, will revoke your testing privileges for the remainder of the semester. ACC Testing Center policies can be found at http://www.austincc.edu/testctr/
 
STUDENT AND INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
ACC strives to provide exemplary support to its students and offers a broad variety of opportunities and services. Information on these services and support systems is available at: http://www.austincc.edu/s4/
Links to many student services and other information can be found at: http://www.austincc.edu/current/
ACC Learning Labs provide free tutoring services to all ACC students currently enrolled in the course to be tutored. The tutor schedule for each Learning Lab may be found at: http://www.austincc.edu/tutor/students/tutoring.php
 
For help setting up ACCeID, ACC Gmail, or ACC Blackboard, see a Learning Lab Technician at any ACC Learning Lab.
 
EXTRA CREDIT
Each of the following assignments is worth one quiz grade. Successful completion of the assignment will earn you a 100 in the grade book. The assignments can be completed in the city of your choice but all have to be representative of the college or professional level. You may complete all or none of the assignments as you please, but all extra credit must be completed before November 20, 2019 (Wednesday). No exceptions!!
 
  1. Visit the museum of your choice. I suggest that you visit the Harry Ransom Center (HRC) on UT campus. The HRC is one of the world’s premier research libraries in the area of liberal arts with extensive collections in rare books, manuscripts, photography, film, art, and the performing arts. Take pictures of yourself there and provide a brochure as proof.
  2. Attend the dramatic production of your choice. The play you attend should be of literary merit (i.e. something that might be studied in college). Please no high school productions. College or professional productions only. Operas are okay. Take pictures of yourself there and provide ticket stubs as proof.
  3. Attend a literary event in Austin, Texas, with one or more of your classmates. All events must be pre-approved by Professor Shanafelt. Find events in the Austin Chronicle, Accent, online, etc. The event must be literary in nature. Some examples include the following: book signing, writer’s conference, author reading, comic-con, and poetry slams. Take pictures of yourself there and provide appropriate documentation as proof (i.e. ticket stubs, brochure, program, etc.).
GRADING RUBRIC
A
For a paper to receive an A, it must have a clearly defined main idea, which is thoughtfully and thoroughly developed with sufficient evidence and plenty of scholarly analysis. Logical development and clear, precise phrasing must be evident. Superior understanding of the subject matter must be apparent. Both length and source requirements must be satisfied. An A paper must be turned in on-time and as required (i.e. in-class, in-print, in black legible ink, and on clean white paper with no stains, rips, frays, or holes). An A paper must adhere to the required MLA document format and be virtually free of mechanical and MLA errors. .
Style - Sentences in an A essay should be correctly constructed with no major grammatical or mechanical errors (such as sentence fragments, run-on sentences, or lack of agreement between subjects and verbs). An A paper must be formatted with the required font type, font size, margin width, character spacing, line spacing, alignment, etc. as defined and illustrated in the course syllabus and essay assignment.   
Structure - An A paper should open with an imaginative title and an effective hook. The introductory paragraph should lead up to a strong thesis statement as its last sentence. Content paragraph structures should approximate the following pattern: TS, EV, AN, EV, AN, EV, AN (i.e. three articles of evidence and accompanying analysis to support each topic sentence. The A paper closes with a thoughtful summation of what the essay has proven and often builds to a general reflection which connects its main idea to our world thereby exposing some larger, important, and perhaps overlooked truth about life. (TS = topic sentence, EV = evidence, AN = analysis)
Content - For a paper to receive an A, it must be on-topic. Its assertions, analysis, evidence, and main idea must directly respond to one of the prompts listed in the essay assignment or to an instructor-approved topic determined well in advance. Its arguments must be well supported with ample textual evidence and peer-reviewed source data, and each article of evidence must be developed and supported with scholarly analysis appropriate to the level of this college course. The argument an A paper makes should be convincing, interesting, and somewhat original. If the paper concludes with a general reflection, that reflection should be a direct result of the essay's rhetorical inertia without obvious breaks in logic (i.e. free from non sequiturs and broken logic). An A essay must answer the question "How does the literature function and make meaning" rather than merely catalogue a list of literary elements present within the piece.     
Documentation - An A paper must be almost completely free of MLA errors, including spacing and alignment of the "Works Cited" page. All sources must be appropriate, reliable, high-level, and scholarly in nature. A minimum of one peer-reviewed journal article must be present and cited as relevant evidence to support one of the essay's primary arguments. 
*Marked Grades: (A+ = 98, A = 95, A- = 92, 90 = 90)
B
In the B paper, the main idea must be developed with some real depth. Ordinarily, a B paper will be completely free of major grammatical errors, and it will show a superior level of thought and expression. (80%-89%)
C
The C paper is one that lacks brilliance but is, at least, logical in the way it develops its main idea. Its phrasing may not be fancy, but it must be reasonably clear and accurate. The paper must be relatively free of major grammatical errors. It must also be relatively free of errors in spelling and punctuation. (70%-79%)
D
The D paper indicates below average work. Such a paper usually has no clearly stated main idea, contains inadequate supporting details, abounds with grammatical and mechanical errors, and/or reveals a serious lack of understanding of the subject matter. (60%-69%)
F
The F paper reflects a complete lack of ability to state or develop a main idea in most instances. This paper may also reveal a total lack of comprehension, as well as major errors in grammar, sentence structure, spelling, punctuation, diction, and MLA documentation. (0%-60%)  
 
** This rubric is intended to be general in nature. The scoring of each individual assignment may vary. **
 

Course Requirements

PREREQUISITES
One of the following must apply:
  • TSI exempt 
  • TSI Assessment Scores: Reading (351); Writing (Essay 4/Objective 340)
  • Grade of C or better in INRW 0230 or 0430
  • Grade of C or better in DEVW 0130, 0330 and DEVR 0320
  • Grade of C or better in Writing and Grammar 5 (ESOL 0384) and Reading and Vocabulary 5 (ESOL 0364) or Reading, Writing, and Grammar 4 (ESOL 0314) or Reading, Writing, and Grammar 4 for Students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (ESOL 0424).
 
SUMMARY OF STUDENT EXPECTATIONS
To successfully complete Composition I, students should enter with the following basic skills: critical reading; content development; organization of writing to include an introduction, appropriate thesis, coherent paragraphs, transitions, and a conclusion; grammar, mechanics, and sentence construction; and an initial understanding of documentation of sources.
 
Here is a link to a list of expectations and skills for students who are enrolling in Composition I: http://www.austincc.edu/english/ExpectationsOfSkills.php

Student Learning Outcomes/Learning Objectives

COURSE OBJECTIVES/RATIONALE 
The goals of Composition I are to promote
  • critical thinking, reading, and writing;
  • clear, coherent, confident, and effective communication;
  • collaborative writing and learning; and
  • exposure (through reading or composing) to a range of genres, including genres incorporating visual design elements.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES 
Upon completion of English 1301, students should be able to
  • demonstrate knowledge of individual and collaborative writing processes
  • develop ideas with appropriate support and attribution
  • write in a style appropriate to audience and purpose
  • read, reflect, and respond critically to a variety of texts
  • use Edited American English in academic essays
DISCIPLINE/PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
The following outcomes are developed in all English Composition I students regardless of student age or course location:
  • expanded critical reading ability;
  • ability to write to the specifications of an assignment in terms of subject, rhetorical purpose, method(s) of organization and length;
  • ability to form a research question, develop a thesis, locate and select credible sources applicable to the thesis, and write an essay of the specified length that responds to the thesis;
  • expanded ability to develop content for an essay and organize writing 
  • expanded ability to use correct grammar and mechanics 
GENERAL EDUCATION LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon completion of the general education component of an associate’s degree, students will demonstrate competence in:
  • Critical Thinking: Gathering, analyzing, synthesizing, evaluating and applying information.
  • Interpersonal Skills: Interacting collaboratively to achieve common goals.
  • Personal Responsibilities: Demonstrating effective learning, creative thinking, and personal responsibility.
  • Technology Skills: Using appropriate technology to retrieve, manage, analyze, and present information.
  • Written, Oral and Visual Communication: Communicating effectively, adapting to purpose, structure, audience, and medium.

 

COURSE CALENDAR
 

Readings

Mth

Date

Day

Assignments & Topics

Aug

26

M

- Introductions
- Syllabus & Class Information
- Library Tutorials Assigned (all)  http://library.austincc.edu/help/Tutorials.php.

 

28

W

- Everything's An Argument - Chapter 22 (MLA Style) (reading due)
- Shanafelt Research & Writing Guide (handout; grammar & writing basics)
- Sources & MLA Documentation (lecture)
- Persuasive Essay Assigned (lecture & in-class readings)

Sep

2

M

- OFF -  LABOR DAY

 

4

W

- Everything's An Argument - Chapter 1 (reading due)
- Rhetorical Purpose & Patterns of Organization (lecture)

 

9

M

- Everything's An Argument - Chapter 2 (Pathos) (reading due)
Academic Honesty/Plagiarism Tutorial Due (submit printed certificates in class)

- Evaluation - (Persuasive) (lecture & in-class readings)

 

11

W

- Everything's An Argument - Chapter 3 (Ethos) (reading due)
- Last day to withdraw without a“W”

 

16

M

- Everything's An Argument - Chapter 4 (Logos) (reading due)

 

18

W

- Everything's An Argument - Chapter 5 (Fallacies) (reading due)
- Persuasive Essay Due (print copy due first 5min; No Emails!)
- Comparison & Contrast Essay Assigned (Referential)
(lecture & in-class readings)

 

23

M

- No Class -  AISD

 

25

W

- Classification / Division (lecture & in-class readings)

 

30

M

- Library Research  (lecture & instruction)
- Library Tutorials Due (All - submit printed certificates in class)

Oct

2

W

- Definition (lecture & in-class readings)

 

7

M

 - Illustration through Examples (lecture & in-class readings)

 

9

W

- Compare and Contrast Essay Due (print copy due first 5min; No Emails!)
- Textual Analysis Essay Assigned (lecture & in-class readings)

 

14

M

- No Class -  AISD

 

16

W

- Description (lecture & in-class readings)

 

21

M

- Narration (lecture & in-class readings)

 

23

W

- Cause and Effect (lecture & in-class readings)

 

28

M

- Process Analysis (lecture & in-class readings)

 

30

W

- Textual Analysis Essay Due (print copy due first 5min; No Emails!)
- Tickets to Departmental Exam Given (must be passing w/ no missing essays)
- Research Paper Assigned (lecture & in-class readings)

- Topics: Use Research to Narrow and Choose (lecture & instruction)

Nov

4

M

- Everything's An Argument - Chapter 17 (Academic Arguments) (reading due)
- Research Paper & MLA Documentation (lecture & in-class readings)

- Thesis Statement (Research Paper) (in-class writing & instruction)

 

6

W

- Everything's An Argument - Chapter 18 (Finding Evidence) (reading due)

- Scholarly Sources: Find & Evaluate (lecture & instruction)

 

11

M

- No Class -  AISD

 

13

W

- Everything's An Argument - Chapter 19 (Evaluating Sources) (reading due)
- Research Paper Outline & Works Cited Due
(pass/fail, print copy checked first 5min)

 

18

M

- Everything's An Argument - Chapter 20 (Using Sources) (reading due)

- Sources: Uses & Techniques (lecture & in-class readings)

 

20

W

- Everything's An Argument - Chapter 21 (Plagiarism) (reading due
- Departmental Exam Deadline (complete ALL attempts before class)
- Extra Credit Deadline (no exceptions!)
- Last day to withdraw with a“W” (Thursday, 21 Nov. 2019)

- Research Paper Workshop (in-class writing & instruction)

 

25

M

- No Class -  Thanksgiving (AISD)

 

27

W

- No Class -  Thanksgiving (AISD)

Dec

2

M

- Research Paper Rough Draft Due (pass/fail, print copy checked first 5min)
- Research Paper Workshop (in-class writing & instruction)

 

4

W

- Review for Final Exam (in-class instruction)

 

9

M

- Final Exam (in-class, timed, objective; bring 100-question Scantron form)

 

11

W

- Research Paper Due (print copy due first 5min; No Emails!)